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What is an e-cigarette or vaping?

An e-cigarette, or vaping, uses a vapor to give nicotine to its users. E-cigarettes use a battery and have a refillable cartridge. The cartridge contains a liquid that is heated to produce a vapor.

What makes up the liquid in vaping?

  • Nicotine

  • Harmful organic compounds

  • Flavoring (diacetyl is one of these which is linked to lung disease)

  • Cancer-causing chemicals

  • Ultrafine chemicals

  • Heavy metals (ie. tin, nickel and lead)

Are there any other names for e-cigarettes?

Yes. Some of them are:

  • E-cigs

  • Hookah pens

  • E-hookahs

  • Vapes

  • Vape pens

  • Mods

  • E-pipes

  • E-cigars

Are teens who vape at a higher risk of smoking cigarettes?

Yes. E-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is highly addictive, and can lead to teens to smoking cigarettes. Nicotine causes damage to the brain and affects how the brain develops. A teen’s brain will keep growing until age 25.

Can vaping help you quit smoking regular cigarettes?

No. At this time, vaping has not been proven to help quit smoking.

Are e-cigarettes safer than regular cigarettes?

No. When vaping, there are many toxic and cancer-causing chemicals and other toxic metal particles that you inhale into the lungs. There have been many cases of severe lung illness and deaths that have been linked to vaping, and the numbers keep rising. We do not have enough research at this time to understand the effects of long-term vaping.

Resources

https://www.centeronaddiction.org/e-cigarettes/about-e-cigarettes/10-surprising-facts-about-e-cigarettes

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/Quick-Facts-on-the-Risks-of-E-cigarettes-for-Kids-Teens-and-Young-Adults.html

https://www.lung.org/stop-smoking/smoking-facts/e-cigarettes-and-lung-health.html

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/electronic-cigarettes-e-cigarettes

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/infographics/youth/pdfs/e-cigarettes-usb-flash-508.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2019/s0821-cdc-fda-states-e-cigarettes.html